Option Screens for UIView or SpriteKit Apps – Tutorial Index

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Option Screens for both UIView or Sprite Kit Apps - Lifetime Access
​In this tutorial, we will focus entirely on creating an Options screen, using a Single View Application or Sprite Kit based project. We’ll create UISwitches, UIButtons, UISliders, UISegmentedControls, groups of buttons that act like segmented controls, and finally, a UIPickerView. Picker views can be made up of single or multiple columns of “spin-able” data. For example, Apple’s Clock app has a Timer function made up of a double column UIPickerView.
Module 1 Introduction and Initial Setup
In this first session we will work on opening and closing new UIView or Sprite Kit scenes.
Unit 1 Option Screens Tutorial - Art Assets and Xcode Projects
Unit 2 Introduction
Unit 3 AppData Singleton
Unit 4 Creating the Options Screen
Unit 5 Using a UIButton to Launch the Options Screen
Unit 6 Opening and Closing the Option Screen
Unit 7 NSTimer / SKAction for Fading and Tinting
Module 2 UISwitches, UISliders, UISegmentedControls and UIButtons
The title of this section about sums it up. Each video will explore adding one of these elements to the screen.
Unit 1 UISwitches
Unit 2 UISliders
Unit 3 UISegmentedControls
Unit 4 UIButton Groups
Module 3 UIPickerViews
In this series of videos we will create single, double and triple picker views and discuss how to interconnect them.
Unit 1 Introduction to using a One Wheel Picker View
Unit 2 Create a Single Column UIPickerView
Unit 3 Using a Property List to Populate the UIPickerView Wheel
Unit 4 Switching to Three Component Wheels
Unit 5 Spinning to Default Values Based on the Property List
Unit 6 Interconnecting the Three Wheels
Unit 7 Testing from the Main Class for a Change in the UIPickerView
Unit 8 Return to Game Button
Module 4 NSUserDefaults and NSNotifications
In the first video, we will save our variables to the standard NSUserDefaults, and use them to retain those same preferences even if the app is closed and restarted. In the final tutorial, we will quickly look at NSNotifications as an alternate means of alerting classes to a preference change (and passing NSObjects between classes via the notification).
Unit 1 NSUserDefaults
Unit 2 NSNotifications

 

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